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editor's pick
  • Updated

In 2016, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service stopped granting exemptions that had, until that time, allowed sand to be mined in Hereford Inlet for the stabilization of beaches in Stone Harbor and North Wildwood.

editor's pick
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Avalon Mayor Martin Pagliughi didn’t hold anything back. The mayor restricted overnight access to the beaches and boardwalk in response to large crowds of individuals often engaged in “unsafe and disruptive behavior.”

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Stone Harbor Borough Council July 6 heard a report from the Public Works Department that some beaches had so little dry sand at high tide that access ramps for the handicapped couldn't be put in place. 

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At a May 26 meeting, Avalon officials provided Borough Council with an update on the litigation over the use of Herford Inlet sand for federal beach nourishment projects.  

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The city planned to delay the final stages of its back-passing project until after Memorial Day weekend, but expected to offer beach access at all paths in time for Memorial Day, North Wildwood Mayor Patrick Rosenello said.

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The Borough of Avalon has begun a sand back passing project that will move approximately 55,000 cubic yards of sand from a permitted borrow area to six blocks of north-end beaches that were eroded during winter storm events.  

editor's pick
  • Updated

Sea Isle City Business Administrator George Savastano reported Oct. 8 that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' $38 million beach replenishment project would start "soon." It is hoped that it will finish no later than mid-June, with a push to finish by mid-spring.