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As we all work to deal with COVID-19, our county and municipalities are forced to continue their essential operations while protecting government employees and facing the additional costs brought on by the pandemic. 

Cape Issues reported on the ambitious county bridge plan Sept. 16. We outlined the plan, which stretches over 15 years and promises to replace or rejuvenate many of the bridges that deteriorated beyond their useful life (https://bit.ly/300JbLh).

Cape May County has long had a problem with the decennial census. In 2010, the county had the worst response rate in the state. In 2020, the numbers are just as bad.

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In New Jersey, there have been recommendations/regulations that have affected our employment status, where we work, if we have a job, where we eat, and where we exercise.

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As our nation works through our response to COVID-19, the conflict associated with ingrained racism, and what it means to the quality of life in the U.S., Cape Issues wants to encourage the citizens of the county to weigh in on these issues and the ongoing challenges we face. 

Cape Issues is a group of county residents who gather regularly to focus on issues they see as vital to the future of the county. One of those issues is the county’s public education system.

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Commendation and public attention are in order for our Atlantic Cape Community College, and their recent program offerings publication regarding “Workforce Development, Certifications, Professional and Community Education” for spring 2020 (January-August).

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The Cape Issues team was established in 2008 as a non-partisan volunteer group to advocate for the betterment of life in Cape May County, a very broad goal. 

Representatives of Cape Issues met recently with newly elected State Sen.  Michael Testa (R–1st) to introduce Cape Issues to him and to discuss how he would approach some of the current challenges facing Cape May County.  

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Healthcare impact has two components: 1) the direct impact of healthcare jobs and technology on the economy; and 2) the impact of the emerging interest in Social Determinants of Healthcare (SDOH) such as homelessness, jobs, education, transportation, poverty, child care, home healthcare, people released from prison, and food insecurity. 

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The Cape Issues team is committed to engage the public to consider and support efforts to enhance the county and an environment with opportunities that support future generations of our citizens.

The public gathered at Atlantic Cape Community College's Court House campus for a Cape Issues-sponsored discussion of the county’s ongoing efforts to establish a centralized emergency dispatch system.

Cape Issues is a group of Cape May County citizens who gather monthly to focus on issues they see as vital to the welfare of the county. As the Herald reported in an article on Nov. 6, Cape Issues is considering the recommendations of the state’s Economic and Fiscal Policy Workgroup, a state…

In Parts I and II of this series about the new countywide emergency dispatch system, the Herald learned that new communications technologies have arrived in Cape May County.

Part II of the series examines both human and financial benefits associated with central dispatch and how improved public safety can be achieved at reduced costs to taxpayers who live in municipalities that choose to participate in the system. 

Life in Cape May County has become more complex; we want to live our lives as safely and simply as possible. Part of the challenge of feeling safe is getting the right police, fire, or emergency medical professionals to help quickly in time of need.

Those who seek to make government work more effectively or more efficiently often point to consolidation as a solution, and with good reason, too. There have been several cases where government consolidation has reduced operational redundancies and overall costs, sometimes also improving services. 

“The era of high-stakes, high-stress standardized testing in New Jersey must end, and I will see that it does.” Gov. Phil Murphy made that promise as he campaigned for the office of the state’s chief executive. 

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This proposal is based on information obtained by two members of the Cape Issues Group, Joe McDevitt and Mike Keaney regarding the reconstruction of Sea Isle Boulevard. This project was started several years ago and is slated for completion around 2020.

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The renewed interest in completing the long-delayed Route 55 has rekindled the established traditions of bureaucracies. 

In the annual Phi Delta Kappa/Gallop Poll concerning the national public school systems, 83 percent of Americans give public schools a grade of C or less.

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Following the completion of State Route 55 from Route 42 in Camden County to Port Elizabeth in Cumberland County in 1986, there have been numerous meetings and discussions about finishing Route 55 to have it link with the Garden State Parkway in Cape May County. 

Has the dream come true? That was the question asked in the Herald’s six-part series on Atlantic Cape Community College. In the view of the Cape Issues committee, the answer is, No. 

At the Oct. 7 meeting of the Cape Issues Committee, the subcommittee assigned to review the facts associated with the question of the Lower Township Municipal Utility Authority (LTMUA) dissolution gave the report of their findings as follows.