porclain berry 2

Porcelain Berry may be pretty, but is a common invasive plant. Learn to identify Cape May’s most common invasive plants, how to control them, and the native species with which to replace them.

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WEST CAPE MAY - The West Cape May Environmental and Shade Tree Commissions have joined together to sponsor a free program “Identifying and Controlling Non-Native Invasive Plants” April 28, from 10 a.m. to noon, at the Rea Farm “Beanery.”

The ‘Beanery” is located on Bayshore Road in West Cape May. The parking access is one-tenth of a mile north of the intersection of Sixth Avenue and Bayshore Road.

Non-native invasive plants are a significant threat to the health of our natural ecosystem; displacing native plants and the animals that rely on them. With the right planning and management, invasive plants can be eradicated from your yard. Join the fight to control these nasty invasives. The butterflies, moths and birds will thank you.

Brittany Dobrzynski, project coordinator of New Jersey Audubon Society, and Dustin Welch, wildlife gardener, will present this program. The outdoors will be the laboratory for this two-hour field day. Attendees will learn to identify Cape May’s most common invasive plants, how to control them, and the native species with which to replace them.

Preregistration is required for this free program. Please send an email to wcmshadetree@gmail.com to register. Please include your name and the number of people attending.

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