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Going out on the water can be dangerous, especially if you don’t have the right equipment. If you do find yourself in trouble, being able to communicate that you need help can be a lifesaver.

Here are the top five items the Coast Guard recommends you take with you on your boat so you can call for help if you need it.

1. VHF-FM Marine Radio:  If you find yourself in distress, calling for help on the radio not only alerts the Coast Guard, but alerts other vessels in the surrounding area who may be able to assist. In addition to being able to call for help, it also allows you to receive important weather information, safety updates, and call bridges to request openings.

2. Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon: Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons can also tell the Coast Guard who the beacon is registered to and how to contact you. Register your beacon and verify your information here.

3. Air horn, whistle, or other approved sound-producing device:  The useful aspect of sound distress signals is that they can be used during any time of the day. Just like on a car or bicycle, boaters should always carry a sound signal to get the attention of other people in the area. For more information, click here.

4. Visual distress signals: Nine of the 16 internationally recognized distress signals are visual distress signals. Three are three pyrotechnic distress signals, and the other six are non-pyrotechnics. While visual distress signals can be helpful when operating in a well-populated area, they should not be relied on as the only method of communicating distress. If you need to use a pyrotechnic distress signal, be sure to point the pyrotechnics in a safe direction, away from yourself and others.

5. Cell phone:  While not reliable enough to be used on its own as an on-water communication device, it’s a good back-up in case your radio isn’t functional, you don’t have a radio, or you don’t know how to use one. The Coast Guard recommends mariners download the official Coast Guard Boating Safety App. One of the many features of the app allows mariners to place an emergency call to the U.S. Coast Guard or 911, and provides you with your current location to provide to emergency personnel.

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